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February 2019

The Beauty of Beargrass at Black and White Lakes

It was late summer of 2015. The snow had melted by February. There was a fire burning in the Queets Rainforest. It was the driest year on record and was my first glimpse at the extremes of climate change. I had already racked up more miles in the Olympics than I had in the previous …

Sacajawea and Hardscrabble: A Double Montana Summit Adventure

Nearly every hike I complete on our Public Lands becomes a favorite. From coastal treks past stunning sea stacks, to rainforest runs, canyon crusades and mountain top meanderings, every mile hiked is a memory I want to relive over and over again. These trails nourish my struggling soul, bringing back meaning and calmness to my …

Open Relationships and Our National Parks

Relationships are tough. They cause pain and heartache, but also bring happiness and love. They give us incredible highs not found anywhere else, while still having the power to completely destroy us for days, weeks, months or years. They come and they go, leaving us forever changed, for bad or for great. They take and …

The Groundbreaking Women of Yellowstone National Park

John Muir. Edward Abbey. Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt. Ansel Adams. Aldo Leopold. These heroes of public lands have many things in common, including being old, white men. While the history of America‚Äôs Public Lands seem to be only filled with members of the patriarchy, there are hundreds, if not thousands of others who deserve the …

Don’t be Fooled by the Lowland Snow, Washington State’s Snowpack is Struggling

As Seattle and the towns of the Puget Sound, Skagit Valley and Olympic Peninsula prepare for another dose of lowland snow, a report from the US Department of Agriculture is issuing some trouble news. Despite snow falling all around the Evergreen State, our mountain snowpack is still way below average, once again leading to a …