Yellowstone to Increase Entrance Fees

Our fearless ranger pal Kaiti May has left her post Mesa Verde National Park and is heading to Yellowstone for the Summer.  And you should totally follow her on Twitter for updates on her road trip, by the way.

Road trips are on the top of people’s vacation dreams, and if you’re thinking of heading to Yellowstone this Summer, it’s time to start planning. Besides the awareness needed to have the perfect trip to the World’s First National Park, you need to also be aware that the entrance fees to Yellowstone have increased since last year. 

First, to be plan your trip, get Doug’s “Road Trip: Seattle to Yellowstone” guidebook.

Second: Read this official Yellowstone press release on updates on entrance fees:

Starting on June 1, 2015, Yellowstone National Park will increase entrance fees for visitors in order to fund important resource protection and visitor facility projects within the park.

“We use our entrance fees to complete critical projects that benefit park visitors and our natural resources,” said Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk. “Eighty percent of the revenue we collect stays right here in Yellowstone and funds projects including road repairs, campground upgrades, rehabilitation of park structures, accessibility improvements for people with disabilities, radio and utility systems improvements, native fish restoration and aquatic invasive species mitigation.”

The park estimates that the new entrance fees will generate $11 million of revenue per year, approximately $3 million greater than current entrance fee revenue.

The new fees are summarized here:

• Vehicles: The entrance fee will be $30 per vehicle to visit Yellowstone National Park for 1-7 days. Grand Teton National Park will have a separate pass for $30. People visiting both parks can save $10 by purchasing a $50 two-park vehicle pass, also valid for 1-7 days.

• Motorcycles: Motorcycles can enter Yellowstone for $25 for 1-7 days or both parks for $40.

• Individuals: Per person fees will be $15 for Yellowstone or $20 for both parks.

• Annual Passes: Yellowstone’s annual pass will be $60. This pass offers visitors in the local area an option that is less expensive than the $80 Interagency Pass. The Interagency Pass rates will remain the same: Annual ($80) and Senior ($10). Military passes and Access passes (for people with permanent disabilities) will remain free.

Third: Find Kaiti May somewhere in the park and say Hi from us!

Time for a road trip, people!

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